close

Badminton – Singles Rules and Regulations

Singles

Badminton can be played by two players. In a singles, two single players (two men or two women) play against each other.

The Court

In normal play, the court is 13.40m long and 5.10m (singles) or 6.10m (doubles) wide. The height of the net is 1.524m over the centre of the court, but 1.55m over the side lines of the doubles court. The singles court always covers the full length of the court, from base line to base line, both in normal play and for the service. Similarly, singles are always played on the narrow court.

The Toss At the beginning of each match, a toss is made to determine which side serves first. The winner of the toss can chose whether to make the first service of the match or whether to return first, thus leaving the first service to the opponent. The side that lost the toss can then chose on which end of the court he/she/they want to start. Alternatively, the side that wins the toss may also choose to select the end of the

At the beginning of each match, a toss is made to determine which side serves first. The winner of the toss can chose whether to make the first service of the match or whether to return first, thus leaving the first service to the opponent. The side that lost the toss can then chose on which end of the court he/she/they want to start. Alternatively, the side that wins the toss may also choose to select the end of the curt on which he/she/they want(s) to start. The right to decide who makes the first service in the match then goes to the side that lost the toss.

At the beginning of each match, a toss is made to determine which side serves first. The winner of the toss can chose whether to make the first service of the match or whether to return first, thus leaving the first service to the opponent. The side that lost the toss can then chose on which end of the court he/she/they want to start. Alternatively, the side that wins the toss may also choose to select the end of the curt on which he/she/they want(s) to start. The right to decide who makes the first service in the match then goes to the side that lost the toss.

The Sets A badminton match commonly consists of up to three sets. The side that first reaches 21 points wins a set (exception: when there is no two-point difference – see below). The side that first wins two sets wins the match. A third set is played if, after two sets, both sides have won one each. After each set, the sides change ends. A short break of up to 90 seconds can be made between sets and in the middle of each set, when the first player reaches 11 points. Strictly speaking, the players may not leave the court during the break, but coaching is allowed.

A badminton match commonly consists of up to three sets. The side that first reaches 21 points wins a set (exception: when there is no two-point difference – see below). The side that first wins two sets wins the match. A third set is played if, after two sets, both sides have won one each. After each set, the sides change ends. A short break of up to 90 seconds can be made between sets and in the middle of each set, when the first player reaches 11 points. Strictly speaking, the players may not leave the court during the break, but coaching is allowed.

A badminton match commonly consists of up to three sets. The side that first reaches 21 points wins a set (exception: when there is no two-point difference – see below). The side that first wins two sets wins the match. A third set is played if, after two sets, both sides have won one each. After each set, the sides change ends. A short break of up to 90 seconds can be made between sets and in the middle of each set, when the first player reaches 11 points. Strictly speaking, the players may not leave the court during the break, but coaching is allowed.

Scoring A rally is won by one side if it plays the shuttle in such a way that it cannot be returned by the opponents and hits the ground inside the opponent’s court (including on the lines), if the opponent’s return does not cross the net or if the opponent’s return hits the ground outside the court boundaries. Furthermore, a side wins the rally if: (one of) the opposing player(s) touches the shuttle with the body before it hits the ground (whether inside or outside the court) (one of) the opposing player(s) touches the net with the racket or the body while the shuttle is in the air (one of) the opposing player(s) hits the shuttle before it has crossed the net (i.e. reaching over to the opponent’s side of the court) one player touches the shuttle more than once a faulty service is played The basic scoring rules are: The winner of each rally scores a point, regardless of who is serving. This means that every mistake, even a faulty service, wins the opponent a point. (Avoidable) mistakes are thus

A rally is won by one side if it plays the shuttle in such a way that it cannot be returned by the opponents and hits the ground inside the opponent’s court (including on the lines), if the opponent’s return does not cross the net or if the opponent’s return hits the ground outside the court boundaries. Furthermore, a side wins the rally if: (one of) the opposing player(s) touches the shuttle with the body before it hits the ground (whether inside or outside the court) (one of) the opposing player(s) touches the net with the racket or the body while the shuttle is in the air (one of) the opposing player(s) hits the shuttle before it has crossed the net (i.e. reaching over to the opponent’s side of the court) one player touches the shuttle more than once a faulty service is played The basic scoring rules are: The winner of each rally scores a point, regardless of who is serving. This means that every mistake, even a faulty service, wins the opponent a point. (Avoidable) mistakes are thus penalised quite heavily. The player winning a rally scores a point and simultaneously wins (or keeps) the right to serve. The winning score in each set is 21 points, but to win a set, a side must lead their opponents by two points or more (see below). A player must lead his/her opponents by a minimum of two points in order to win a set. The closest possible winning score with 21 points is therefore 21-19. If the score reaches 20-20, the set is won by the first player or pair building up a two point lead or by the first player or pair to score 30 points. This means that possible winning scores are 22-20, 21-23, 22-24,…, 29-27, 30-28 – or 30-29: if score reaches 29-29, the next player to score a point wins the set with a score of 30-29. This is the only exception when no margin of two points is needed to win a set. The winning score for a set is the same in all five disciplines. Serving The service line for a singles game is the back line of the court. The serve — not to be executed until both players indicate they are ready — must be underhanded and completed behind the service line. In singles, a player serves from the right service court diagonally over the net to his opponent’s right service court when the server has a score of zero or an even number. When the server has scored an odd number of points, she serves from her left service court into her opponent’s left service court.

A rally is won by one side if it plays the shuttle in such a way that it cannot be returned by the opponents and hits the ground inside the opponent’s court (including on the lines), if the opponent’s return does not cross the net or if the opponent’s return hits the ground outside the court boundaries. Furthermore, a side wins the rally if: (one of) the opposing player(s) touches the shuttle with the body before it hits the ground (whether inside or outside the court) (one of) the opposing player(s) touches the net with the racket or the body while the shuttle is in the air (one of) the opposing player(s) hits the shuttle before it has crossed the net (i.e. reaching over to the opponent’s side of the court) one player touches the shuttle more than once a faulty service is played The basic scoring rules are: The winner of each rally scores a point, regardless of who is serving. This means that every mistake, even a faulty service, wins the opponent a point. (Avoidable) mistakes are thus penalised quite heavily. The player winning a rally scores a point and simultaneously wins (or keeps) the right to serve. The winning score in each set is 21 points, but to win a set, a side must lead their opponents by two points or more (see below). A player must lead his/her opponents by a minimum of two points in order to win a set. The closest possible winning score with 21 points is therefore 21-19. If the score reaches 20-20, the set is won by the first player or pair building up a two point lead or by the first player or pair to score 30 points. This means that possible winning scores are 22-20, 21-23, 22-24,…, 29-27, 30-28 – or 30-29: if score reaches 29-29, the next player to score a point wins the set with a score of 30-29. This is the only exception when no margin of two points is needed to win a set. The winning score for a set is the same in all five disciplines. Serving The service line for a singles game is the back line of the court. The serve — not to be executed until both players indicate they are ready — must be underhanded and completed behind the service line. In singles, a player serves from the right service court diagonally over the net to his opponent’s right service court when the server has a score of zero or an even number. When the server has scored an odd number of points, she serves from her left service court into her opponent’s left service court.

Overview A singles match in badminton features one player on each side of the net. You’ll get more of a cardiovascular workout in a singles game than in a game of doubles, because you are responsible for the entire side of your court. The Badminton World Federation, based in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, writes and regularly updates the formal Laws of Badminton, which govern all official international competitions.

A singles match in badminton features one player on each side of the net. You’ll get more of a cardiovascular workout in a singles game than in a game of doubles, because you are responsible for the entire side of your court. The Badminton World Federation, based in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, writes and regularly updates the formal Laws of Badminton, which govern all official international competitions.

Match A badminton match consists of a best two-out-of-three game series. The BWF requires players to win a game by a margin of two points. Play each game to 21 points unless, without a two-point margin, the score reaches 29-all. At 29-all you only need a one-point margin, meaning the first player to reach 30 points is the winner.

Points When the server wins the rally, he scores a point, retains the serve and moves to the alternate service court to serve again. When the receiver wins the rally, she earns the serve, but may or may not gain a point depending on the set of rules in use. In official BWF play, the receiver scores points. However, in classic-rules badminton, used at some college recreational programs, only the server can earn points.

When the server wins the rally, he scores a point, retains the serve and moves to the alternate service court to serve again. When the receiver wins the rally, she earns the serve, but may or may not gain a point depending on the set of rules in use. In official BWF play, the receiver scores points. However, in classic-rules badminton, used at some college recreational programs, only the server can earn points.

Faults In official BWF games, faults result in a point for your opponent and you must surrender the serve. Swinging at, but missing, the shuttle on the serve is a fault; as is hitting the shuttle so it passes underneath, rather than over, the net. You can also receive a fault when you hit the shuttle out of bounds or for touching the shuttle with your body or clothing.

In official BWF games, faults result in a point for your opponent and you must surrender the serve. Swinging at, but missing, the shuttle on the serve is a fault; as is hitting the shuttle so it passes underneath, rather than over, the net. You can also receive a fault when you hit the shuttle out of bounds or for touching the shuttle with your body or clothing.

Tags : Pysical Education
Close Bitnami banner
Bitnami